Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

If you want to explore a route that’s steeped in history without having to go further afield, then St Cuthbert’s Way could be the ideal route for your next walking holiday, and is one of Scotland’s more popular hiking routes.

The scenery has largely remained untouched from the days of 650 AD when the legendary St Cuthbert himself would have traversed the route that bears his name. Just what you want when you want to get away from the hustle and bustle back home, and immerse yourself in a corner of the UK.

Over 60 miles of Uninterrupted Walking Routes to Savour

With over 60 miles of walking routes that weave their way between the Scottish Borders and beautiful Northumberland, you’ll be spoilt for choice when it comes to deciding what to see. The great thing about St Cuthbert’s is that whilst it’s popular and well known, it’s never overrun with your fellow walkers, or coaches of holidaymakers. That means you can walk largely unhindered the entire way, and not feel like you’re going along with the crowd everywhere you go. Great when your aim is to have a rest from your usual hectic schedule back home.

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

Finish Along the Causeway That’s Only Revealed at Low Tide

It might be a little early in this article to be talking about its end, but it’s something you really need to know about. If you get to the end, you can enjoy an ancient causeway that is only revealed to you at low tide. Getting there when the tide is on its way out for the afternoon and taking in everything you see before you is the best way to get a true sense of the beauty of the local area.

By seeing your final few hundred metres emerge over the course of a couple of hours, you’ll see just what a wonderful area it is. It’ll also give you the perfect chance to rest up and enjoy a picnic in the sun before you head home. Ideal for finishing on a high, so that you can’t wait to come back again next year.

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

Easily Walkable in 5 Days by Walkers of All Abilities

The terrain is undulating and never anything approaching severe. If you’re a seasoned walker who really wants to push on and test yourself, then try and complete the Way in 3 days rather than the customary 5. Don’t feel like you need to rush it to get the most out of it however, because there’s far more to St Cuthbert’s than working up a sweat and getting dozens and dozens of miles under your feet.

This is a part of the UK steeped in history, culture, and tradition. And it’s one that you’ll want to spend as much time in as possible. Meet the locals, take some photos, and eat outside as often as you can. That way you’ll return home knowing that you really did manage to connect with nature.

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

Baggage Transfer Available if You Want to Take a Few Home Comforts with You

Travelling as light as you can works for some people, but not others. There’s nothing wrong with that, and sometimes a few additional home comforts can make all the difference on your trip away. If you don’t want to go without, or if you want to have as much energy left over at the end of the day as possible, why not make use of one of the baggage transfer services that are available?

They’re a great way to have your bags sent ahead so that you have the peace of mind that they’ll arrive in one piece. It’ll also mean that you can go out and see more of the local sights once you arrive at your home for the night. You might think it’s cheating a little bit, but who cares if it allows you to get more out of your holiday!

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

Stunning Scenery That’s Only an Hour from Edinburgh

The scenery is beautiful, and if you really want to experience a contrast, you could go and explore Edinburgh for the day once you finish the Way. It’s a city with a rich history and a really welcoming atmosphere. If you don’t live nearby and you’ve never been, make sure you find the time to give the city a closer look. As the birthplace of the Scottish Enlightenment, it has plenty to offer in terms of museums, architecture, and numerous other places of significant historical interest.

Travelling in the Spring is the Best Way to get the Most out of Your Stay

Spring is probably the best time to walk the Way as it allows you to enjoy some beaming sunshine, but without the searing temperatures that often come with it in summer. The calming sea breeze is the ideal way to take the edge off, and it won’t turn into a strong head wind at this time of year either. If you have the freedom to travel outside of the school holidays, then you’ll also find it’s noticeably quieter. Just what you need if you want to get away from the crowds and have a relaxing break with just the two of you.

Hiking St Cuthbert’s Way

The 3 Guidebooks about St Cuthbert’s Way You Need to Take a Closer Look at

St Cuthbert’s Way by the highly knowledgeable Roger Smith is a book worth reading if you want to immerse yourself in as much local history as possible. It also features dozens of stunning photos, and plenty of opinions about where you should stop off for a closer look.

Ronald Turnball’s St Cuthbert’s Way is also well worth a read if you want to enjoy the expansive detail that you’ll rarely find on sites like TripAdvisor. It’s a well written and easy to digest book that’s designed to be taken with you on the Way. Great for ensuring you don’t miss anything out along the way.

Finally, Roger Noyce’s The Complete Guide to St Cuthbert’s Way also comes highly recommended if you’re the kind of walker who wants to get the most out of their time away.

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